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Measuring Receptor Occupancy With Flow Cytometry

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Measuring the receptor occupancy of a given target showcases the power of flow cytometry. With the right reagents, best practices, and attention to detail, this assay can become a mainstay in your research toolkit. It extends quantitative flow cytometry to the next level, to determine a complete biological picture of how efficiently a given target is being bound. This also serves as the basis for even more fine-analysis when combined with assessment of downstream targets that the engagement of the receptor by the target antibody may affect. Phosphorylation, cell cycle arrest, and protein expression are all within reach, resulting in an even more complete picture of the process, that will ultimately give the medical community a fuller understanding of how these potential therapeutics work and when to use them. This is truly personalized medicine at its fullest potential.

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Planning For Surface Staining Of Cells In Flow Cytometry

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One of the most common assays in flow cytometry is the surface labeling of cells with antibodies. Often termed “immunophenotyping”, it allows the researcher to identify, count, and isolate cells of interest in a mix of input cells. Every lab has their own favorite protocol to move from sample to cytometer, handed down from some hallowed, chemical-stained notebook, and followed as exactly as making a souffle. The real questions are, which of those steps are critical, and what other factors should be considered when staining cells? This article will focus on staining immune cells, but the principles apply in general, and specific issues for a specific sample type can be optimized in a similar way.

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4 Ways To Achieve Reproducible Flow Cytometry Results

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There are several areas that researchers can focus on to improve the reproducibility of their flow cytometry experiments. From instrument quality control, through validation of reagents, to reporting out the findings, a little effort will go a long way to ensure that flow cytometry data is robust, reproducible, and accurately reported to the greater scientific community. Initiatives by ISAC have further offered additional levels of standards to support these initiatives, which were developed even before the Reproducibility Crisis came to a head in both scientific and popular literature.

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4 Steps To Validate Flow Cytometry Antibodies And Improve Reproducibility

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Until we have access to well-validated recombinant antibodies produced under tightly regulated conditions, researchers need to exercise good judgment regarding these critical biological reagents. These 4 steps will help ensure that your results are consistent and reproducible. This will both reassure your reviewers that your data is of high quality, and allow for researchers at other institutions to successfully replicate your results. In addition, identifying antibody duds early on will save you time and money in the long run. Don’t shirk the work of ensuring your antibodies are working correctly and targeting the right proteins.

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How To Use Flow Cytometry To Measure Apoptosis, Necrosis, and Autophagy

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Using flow cytometry and a host of different reagents, it is possible to tease out how your cells may have died. Using these tools, you can readily eliminate the various suspects and come to your conclusion as to how your treatment may have killed your cells of interest. Here are some reagents to consider when measuring apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy.

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