Optimization Archives | Expert Cytometry | Flow Cytometry Training Optimization Archives | Expert Cytometry | Flow Cytometry Training

Blog

Using Begley’s Rules To Improve Reproducibility In Flow Cytometry

Pin It

Cell sorting is a combination of a numbers game (Recovery), quality of output (Purity) and speed. For any experiment, the end goal is going to be measured by these three characteristics, and as soon as one of these measures is more heavily favored, the other two must be compromised in some manner.
When designing a sorting experiment, start with the question of what will the cells be used for after sorting, and how many cells will you need for those experiments? That will set the minimum recovery that is needed. The second question is how pure do you need the cells? The requirements of the downstream assay will also dictate the purity needed.

The cell type being used will, in part, dictate the speed of sorting. Smaller cells can be sorted faster because a smaller nozzle can be used.

When you start a cell sort it’s important that you are aware of the downstream analysis and assays that you want to run. This will determine how you perform the sort and how you determine if your sort was successful or not.
Successful cell sorting involves balancing recovery, yield and speed. What do these three terms mean and what influences each of these factors?

Read More

From Purity To Biosafety, Understanding The Cell Sorting Process

Pin It

Cell sorting is a combination of a numbers game (Recovery), quality of output (Purity) and speed. For any experiment, the end goal is going to be measured by these three characteristics, and as soon as one of these measures is more heavily favored, the other two must be compromised in some manner.
When designing a sorting experiment, start with the question of what will the cells be used for after sorting, and how many cells will you need for those experiments? That will set the minimum recovery that is needed. The second question is how pure do you need the cells? The requirements of the downstream assay will also dictate the purity needed.

The cell type being used will, in part, dictate the speed of sorting. Smaller cells can be sorted faster because a smaller nozzle can be used.

When you start a cell sort it’s important that you are aware of the downstream analysis and assays that you want to run. This will determine how you perform the sort and how you determine if your sort was successful or not.
Successful cell sorting involves balancing recovery, yield and speed. What do these three terms mean and what influences each of these factors?

Read More

Best Flow Cytometry Cell Sorting Practices

Pin It

As a researcher, you want to achieve the best cell sorting possible. So, how can you achieve that? There are clear strategies you can use to achieve great cell sorting results, including finding your ideal sample concentration, using magnetic sorting to enrich your population, suspending cells in the right buffer to avoid cell clumps, changing your instrument settings when sorting small cells, and optimizing your sample preparation and instrument when sorting large cells.

Read More
Flow Cytometry Education And Consulting - Affordable. Effective. Leading Edge.